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Media Hit | Health Care

Pay for Delay

Dr. Michael Wilkes from the University of California, Davis school of Medicine talks about pay-for-delay on his KCRW show "Second Opinion" 

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Media Hit | Health Care

Consumers are paying more money for certain drugs

The California Public Interest Research Group  released the report on  a practice critics call "Pay for delay."   That's when brand name drug companies pay off generic manufacturers to delay putting generic versions on the market.  As a result, consumers end up paying a lot more. The study found in some cases hundreds of dollars more were spent on meds used to treat cancer,  depression and heart disease. 

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Media Hit | Health Care

Pharmaceutical companies pay to delay generics

The report, from the California Public Interest Research Group and Community Catalyst, a nonprofit advocate for affordable health care, said pay-for-delay deals enable companies to continue to sell their brand-name drugs at high prices well after their original patents have expired.

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Media Hit | Health Care

Drug Makers Stall Generics With “Pay For Delay” Says CALPIRG

The California Public Interest Research Group or CALPIRG has released details on what it says is a practice that leads to prescription drug price inflation. CALPIRG calls it “pay for delay.” CALPIRG says the practice of keeping generics off the market makes consumers pay more for medications that treat conditions like cancer and high cholesterol.

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Media Hit | Health Care

CALPIRG study claims drug companies hold back generic meds

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KCRA) —A study by a public interest group found Californians have overpaid for medications because brand-made drugs were delayed from reaching pharmacies.

Read more: http://www.kcra.com/news/calpirg-study-claims-drug-companies-hold-back-generic-meds/-/11797728/20945964/-/uh9rdr/-/index.html#ixzz2YrSJnikK

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Media Hit | Budget

The Los Angeles Times: Citigroup hacker attack affected more customers than first thought

The breach in Citigroup Inc.'s online security, affecting more customers than originally thought, shows that financial institutions still are struggling to block hackers and still are loath to explain to customers and the public what thieves took.

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News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund | Consumer Protection

Business Credit Cards: Liability without protection

CALPIRG Education Fund warns Californians to think twice before responding to one of the millions of business credit card offers that are mailed out to California households each year.

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Media Hit | Transportation

The Bakersfield Californian: Fresno rally calls for more bullet train money

Supporters of California's high-speed rail project gathered in Fresno Wednesday to urge federal officials to give the state most of the $2.4 billion in bullet train money turned away in February by Florida.

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News Release | CALPIRG education Fund | Consumer Protection

New Survey Shows Banks Still Hiding Fees from Consumers

A survey of more than 350 bank branches released today by the California Public Interest Research Group Education Fund revealed that fewer than half of branches obeyed their legal duty to fully disclose fees to prospective customers, while one in four provided no fee information at all.

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Media Hit | Health Care

Sacramento Bee Viewpoints: Reviled health care law already helping people

A year after the passage of the federal health reform, the debate over the law continues to rage on the cable news shows and in Washington. Unfortunately, these fights have given off far more heat than light, with the inside-the-Beltway squabbles being mostly focused on scoring political points and not on assessing what the law is actually doing for real people.

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News Release | US PIRG

A state jury in Oakland decided that the use of Roundup by a California couple for residential landscaping over a 30 year period was a “substantial factor” that led to them developing non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.

News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

In a major victory for California families,state officials announced this week they will prohibit the use of chlorpyrifos, a neurotoxic pesticide linked to permanent brain damage in young children.Gov. Newsom also announced funding to help farmers transition to safer alternatives. The process is expected to take from six months to two years.

 

With this decision, California becomes the third state to ban chlorpyrifos, following Hawaii and New York. This is also the first time the Golden State canceled the registration of a currently-used pesticide.

 

News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

The second largest school district in the country recently took a big step to get the lead out of their drinking water. On April 23rd, the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) voted to spend $15 million to retest drinking water outlets, and either fix or replace water fountains where tests come back positive for at least 5 parts per billion (ppb) of lead.

News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Fisher-Price recalled 4.7 million Rock n’Play baby sleepers on Friday. U.S. PIRG Consumer Watchdog Adam Garber issued a response: "“While we’re pleased that Fisher-Price is finally recalling these dangerous sleepers, 30 deaths in 10 years is 30 deaths too many and 10 years too late."

News Release

Read U.S. PIRG's statement on Wells Fargo eliminating some fees for student on debit cards.

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