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Media Hit | Health Care

Consumers are paying more money for certain drugs

The California Public Interest Research Group  released the report on  a practice critics call "Pay for delay."   That's when brand name drug companies pay off generic manufacturers to delay putting generic versions on the market.  As a result, consumers end up paying a lot more. The study found in some cases hundreds of dollars more were spent on meds used to treat cancer,  depression and heart disease. 

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Media Hit | Health Care

Pharmaceutical companies pay to delay generics

The report, from the California Public Interest Research Group and Community Catalyst, a nonprofit advocate for affordable health care, said pay-for-delay deals enable companies to continue to sell their brand-name drugs at high prices well after their original patents have expired.

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Media Hit | Health Care

Drug Makers Stall Generics With “Pay For Delay” Says CALPIRG

The California Public Interest Research Group or CALPIRG has released details on what it says is a practice that leads to prescription drug price inflation. CALPIRG calls it “pay for delay.” CALPIRG says the practice of keeping generics off the market makes consumers pay more for medications that treat conditions like cancer and high cholesterol.

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Media Hit | Health Care

CALPIRG study claims drug companies hold back generic meds

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KCRA) —A study by a public interest group found Californians have overpaid for medications because brand-made drugs were delayed from reaching pharmacies.

Read more: http://www.kcra.com/news/calpirg-study-claims-drug-companies-hold-back-generic-meds/-/11797728/20945964/-/uh9rdr/-/index.html#ixzz2YrSJnikK

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News Release | CALPIRG | Health Care

Twenty Top Generic Drugs Delayed By Industry Payoffs

The report, “Top Twenty Pay-for-Delay Drugs: How Drug Industry Payoffs Delay Generics, Inflate Prices and Hurt Consumers” reveals that these drugs were subject to an industry practice called “pay for delay,” in which brand name pharmaceutical companies pay off generic drug manufacturers to keep lower cost equivalents off the market, forcing consumers to pay higher brand-name drug prices.

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Media Hit | Democracy

The Bakersfield Californian: EDITORIAL: Political gift-taking stains state's legislative process

If politicians are convinced that they are in no way swayed by gifts of tickets, travel and swag bestowed by lobbyists in a never-ending Christmas morning of influence-peddling, good for them. We aren't.

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Media Hit | Democracy

The Los Angeles Times: Trips, tickets and golf for California lawmakers highlight laxity of ethics rules

Trips to Spain and Argentina, choice Lakers tickets, gourmet meals and rounds of golf are among the $637,000 in gifts that elected state officials accepted last year, many from companies and groups that lobby in Sacramento.

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Media Hit | Health Care

Insurance Commissioner Must Respond to Rate Hikes

 Without strong implementation of new health care laws, the cost of health care will continue to grow faster than income and inflation.

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Media Hit | Transportation

San Diego Union-Tribune: Obama revs up support for transportation funding

Today President Barack Obama -- surrounded by transportation officials, politicians and policy experts -- called on Republicans to get behind his initial $50 billion spending proposal to bring the country’s transportation infrastructure into the 21st century.

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Media Hit | Higher Ed

The Daily Californian: New Federal Law May Reduce Textbook Prices for Students

After struggling to pay for the increasing costs of higher education, students could see a decrease in textbook prices and an overall improvement in the textbook industry this fall due to a new federal law that aims to hold textbook publishers more accountable.

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News Release | U.S. PIRG Education Fund

Recycling challenges vary across the country, but, overall, states are failing to both reduce unnecessary waste and adjust to a changing recycling landscape, according to a new study from U.S. PIRG Education Fund and Environment America Research & Policy Center.

News Release | U.S. PIRG

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released its new Antibiotic Resistance Threats in the United States report, which estimates at least 35,000 Americans die annually from infections that antibiotics can no longer effectively treat.

News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

Oakland: Most top fast food chains in the United States continue to sell beef produced with routine antibiotic use, earning them poor grades in the fifth annual Chain Reaction scorecard released today by six major consumer, public health and environmental organizations. This is a stark contrast to the stunning antibiotic success story that has unfolded across the chicken industry in the past decade, driven in large part by meaningful policies adopted by fast food companies. 

News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

Sacramento - Today, CALPIRG Education Fund released a new report, “What are Californians Trying to Fix?” which looks at what items people in California are trying to fix, and why that can be difficult to do. The report highlights the growing call for “Right to Repair” reforms, which would require manufacturers to make parts and service information available to consumers who want to reduce waste and save money by extending the life of the products they buy. 

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