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Blog Post | Consumer Protection

30 Years of "Trouble in Toyland," 30 Years of Safety Improvements | Anna Low-Beer

Every year, U.S. PIRG Education Fund releases Trouble in Toyland, a report on toy safety which examines toys bought at major national retailers, looking for safety hazards including toxic toys, choking hazards, labeling violations, powerful magnets, and excessibely loud toys. We continue to find these hazards on store shelves, which indicates the need for continued vigilance and adequate enforcement of safety regulations. But despite lingering dangers, in the last 30 years, we've come a long way in terms of both policy and compliance with standards.

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Blog Post | Transportation

Millennials Want More Public Transportation

A new poll shows that access to public transportation is “very important” for Millennials in considering where to live and where to work.  The results support our research over the past few years that found Millennials are driving less than older generations and are more prone to walk, bike, or take transit to get where they need to go.

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Blog Post | Public Health

Victory! Subway Commits to Help Save Antibiotics

Yesterday Subway announced their plan to serve only antibiotic-free meat. Subway announced that they will completely phase out all antibiotic meat by 2025, with antibiotic free chicken made available by March 2016 and turkey by December 2016. This is a significant victory for public health.

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News Release | CALPIRG | Public Health

Following Public Pressure, Subway Announces Plan to Transition to Meat Raised Without Antibiotics

We're ecstatic that Subway will be living up to the healthy image they've created. They have more restaurants in the U.S. than any other chain, and their announcement will put major market pressure on the meat producers to stop overusing antibiotics."

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Report | CALPIRG Education Fund and Citizens for Tax Justice | Tax

Offshore Shell Games 2015

U.S.-based multinational corporations are allowed to play by a different set of rules than small and domestic businesses or individuals when it comes to the tax code. Rather than paying their full share, many multinational corporations use accounting tricks to pretend for tax purposes that a substantial portion of their profits are generated in offshore tax havens, countries with minimal or no taxes where a company’s presence may be as little as a mailbox. Multinational corporations’ use of tax havens allows them to avoid an estimated $90 billion in federal income taxes each year.

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Media Hit | Higher Ed

The Daily Californian: New Federal Law May Reduce Textbook Prices for Students

After struggling to pay for the increasing costs of higher education, students could see a decrease in textbook prices and an overall improvement in the textbook industry this fall due to a new federal law that aims to hold textbook publishers more accountable.

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Media Hit | Democracy

The Sacramento Bee: Bill seeks to curb corporate political spending

Democratic lawmakers took aim Monday at corporate political spending after businesses poured millions of dollars into measures on the California primary ballot.

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Media Hit | Democracy

The San Francisco Chronicle: Politicians raise money outside their districts

California's state legislators collect the vast majority of their campaign contributions from organizations and individuals outside the districts they represent, according to a study by the nonprofit organization Maplight.org.

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Media Hit | Transportation

Los Angeles Times: L.A. mass transit agencies make only a token effort to get people onboard

Your basic middle-class L.A. household spends about $8,600 a year on gas, insurance, parking and vehicle maintenance, according to the California Public Interest Research Group, a watchdog organization.

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The Sacramento Bee: Finding out who sells personal info to junk-mail firms is tough

Californians often are frustrated in attempts to determine which businesses are selling their personal information to junk-mail firms, according to a study released Wednesday by the California Public Interest Research Group.

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Blog Post

With the overwhelming number of reviews found both on website listings and social media, we pulled together the best tips to spot fake reviews when shopping online.

News Release | US PIRG Education Fund

The current shortage of used cars on the market -- and correlated increased prices -- could make consumers more desperate and vulnerable to falling for a bad deal.

Blog Post

Before listening to In Case You Get Hit By a Bus, I didn’t know about insurance that covers the costs of long-term care, such as home health care or nursing home care, for people who need assistance with daily living activities. 

Report | CALPIRG Education Fund, Environment California Research and Policy Center, Frontier Group

More than one in six Americans, 58.4 million people, suffered through more than 100 days of elevated air pollution in 2020.

News Release | CALPIRG Education Fund

Over 28 million Californians —about 70% of the state’s population— experienced over 100 days of unhealthy air quality in 2020.

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